Monthly Archives: August 2018

Is Hurricane Control Possible?

Eye of the Storm Image from Outer Space

The NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Association) experts have thrown”cold water” on pest management schemes. This guide will have a look at the”Proverbial Pipe Dream” of Hurricane Control and suggest a practical solution. At present there a variety of various hurricane control proposals.

Hurricane control in the present context really means to weaken the hurricane force winds. In the Western North Pacific and the Philippines the windstorms are known as Typhoons. Cyclones are windstorms in the Indian and South Pacific Ocean. When the ocean temperature is about 80 degrees F (26 C) or a hurricane can occur. The hurricanes function by drawing warm ocean air up through the eye of the hurricane. This is a convection process with hot air which is less dense rising. Current hurricane control methods try to disrupt this convection procedure.

First lets look at “cloud seeding”. Cloud seeding is done to increase precipitation by introducing small particles of different chemicals into the atmosphere from the ground or by air. These particles are introduced to the eyewall of the hurricane to interrupt the upward flow of moist air. Another method proposed is to cool the waters of the sea where hurricanes are most likely to develop with long vertical tubes. These wave actuated pumps would bring warm surface water to the bottom and induce cool water up. Again this could disrupt the convection process. Giant sized fans have even been suggested to blow the hurricane back to the Atlantic ocean. Animated”cartoon like” processes, even though well meaning, don’t work for these reasons. The huge size and power of a hurricane make these sort of schemes unlikely to work. Information from the NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meterological Laboratory provides some insight into the power of a hurricane.

A good example is Hurricane Andrew which hit South Florida in 1992. The area of destruction was 20 miles wide. The heat energy in this hurricane eye was”5000 times” the heat and electric power generation of the Turkey Point nuclear power plant where the eye past. The kinetic energy of the wind at any instant was comparable to that released by a nuclear warhead. A realistic hurricane control system would need to be ready to go into surgery within 1 day. Only about 10 percent of the tropical systems that form grow into hurricanes. Trying to attack them early would be a wasted effort. The hurricane control system should be able to be put into operation when the hurricane is at least a category 1 and is going toward a populated area.

I’m proposing a modification of a fairly popular and tested way of decreasing a hurricanes destructive power. The method I’m referring to is Space Solar Power. Solar panels in earth orbit can convert solar power into a microwave beam. This microwave beam can then be aimed at a hurricane eyewall to heat it and interfere with the hurricanes convection procedure. A government project named HAARP (High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program) has demonstrated that microwave energy can be directed at the ionosphere and heat it.

Space solar power projects to control hurricanes involve launching a satellite into orbit. Until this method is fully proven. A more economical approach would be to save the price of the launch and the satellite and mount the microwave equipment on a boat. This ship could be under the supervision of a state government and called into service by the governor of a potentially affected state. The ship could stay back from the hurricane eyewall and target its own microwave antennas at a 45 degree or lesser angle. This ship could be called into action within 4 hours notice. If this program works another boat can be built and sold to another state or foreign country for a profit.

Current weather trends make this plan more likely to be effective. An NOAA research study has found that Global Warming has made hurricanes globally move slower and remain over of populated areas longer. There by causing more harm and increasing the chances for flooding in the region the hurricane is hovering over. Some thing should be done to try to minimize the impact of hurricanes.

Hurricanes cause damage each year and a system ought to be built to restrain or weaken there impact.

Legend of Lime Jell-O

Slime Jelly Aspic Jello Blue Funny Creatur

Read the full article to learn about your favorite dessert. Radio stars of the 30s and 40s Jack Benny and Lucille Ball were sponsored by the beloved product, and its commercials dominated early television shows. Who did not love that colorful, jiggly, fun texture and flexibility. Little kids delighted in it, adults found it refreshing and light, and older folks enjoyed it as a simple and sweet conclusion to an otherwise bland meal in a nursing home. It was a predictable, familiar and welcome sight to millions. It soothed young kids at home with measles and graced the food trays of surgery patients as it eased back them into eating solid foods. It was also the foundation for tomato aspics and molded salmon mousse. Although it had some limitations due to mobility and temperature, it frequently took centre stage at picnics and backyard barbecues. It was like one of the household.

It was introduced in the late 1800s by an entrepreneur named Pearle Wait and his wife May, who experimented with grinding gelatin into a powder, which was a collagen originally extracted from the tissues and hooves of barnyard animals, including flavorings and sugar that generated the very first sweet version of gelatin. After several dismal years, they ran a large ad in the Ladies’ Home Journal magazine, hyping the new vibrant sweet as”America’s favorite dessert” and the product removed. Inexpensive, easy to make and fun for kids, it became a staple in the American household and continues to this day. It went on to be acquired by several large companies over the years and refined and marketed as an inexpensive”salad” and dessert.

The top five favorite flavors are:
1) lime
2) strawberry
3) berry blue
4) cherry
5) watermelon

LeRoy, New York is known as its birthplace and contains the only Jell-O Museum in the world, prominently situated on the main street through this small town. According to Kraft foods, the state of Utah eats twice as much lime jello as any other state (possibly those large Mormon families account for that). The theory is that Mormons have quite a sweet tooth (they also have the most candy in the country) and if requested to bring a green salad into a dinner, they’ll show up with lime Jell-O (favorite add-ins consist of shredded carrots or canned pears).

A hugely popular concoction during the 1950s was a lime jello recipe which featured whipped topping, cottage cheese or cream cheese, crushed pineapple, mini marshmallows and walnuts. It frequently appeared at baby showers, luncheons, church potlucks and buffet dinners, usually formed by a big mold and trimmed with mayo. U.S. stats tell us 159.72 million Americans consumed flavored gelatin desserts in 2017, but this figure is projected to reduce to 154.07 million in 2020.

Although the younger generation is moving in another direction and consumption stats show a decline in this once beloved staple of American cuisine, it still holds its own at any family gathering. And most people agree, there is always room for Jell-O.